UNNATURAL CAUSES is inequality making us sick? HEALTH EQUITY research topics and resources to learn more
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Image Thumbnail Undoing Racism Action Group E-mail to a friend
WEB SITE

The CityMatCH Undoing Racism Action Group strives to:
(1) Guide the organization through learning experiences to better understand institutional racism and how it manifests in the world around us;
(2) Identify barriers within and beyond the CityMatCH organization and create a safe environment to discuss the issue of racism openly and honestly; and
(3) Identify undoing racism strategy and training opportunities to benefit CityMatCH membership.

Image Thumbnail Undoing Racism in Public Health: A Blueprint for Action in Urban MCH E-mail to a friend
REPORT by CityMatCH, August 2004

Eliminating racial and ethnic disparities is a sustained, strategic priority in CityMatCH's work with nearly 150 member local health departments whose jurisdictions include the largest 200 cities and major metropolitan areas in the nation. This report aims to examine the scientific basis for racism as a determinant of health status and health disparities, and institutional racism manifests in health care and health departments; provide an overview of existing directions, options and resources for "Undoing Racism;" and outline a series of activities for a local public health-based Undoing Racism initiative, ranging from awareness to action.

Image Thumbnail Undoing Racism: A Gardener's Tale E-mail to a friend
ARTICLE and VIDEO PRESENTATION by Camara Phyllis Jones

In a 2002 videotaped interview for the CityMatCH Annual Urban MCH Leadership Conference, Dr. Jones shared a simple yet remarkably profound allegory she developed to help people come to a place of understanding about the many layers and nuances of institutionalized, personally-mediated, and internalized racism.

A family physician and epidemiologist by training, Dr. Jones' lifelong passion has been naming and addressing the impacts of racism on the health and wellbeing of the nation. 

The page also include a link to her 2003 article using the same allegory, "Levels of Racism: A Theoretic Framework and a Gardener's Tale."

Image Thumbnail Unraveling the Mystery of Black-White Differences in Infant Mortality E-mail to a friend
VIDEO EXCERPT, Unnatural Causes

Neonatologists James Collins and Richard David specialize in the care of infants born too soon or too small. Their research on differences in birth outcomes between African American and white American women points to a provocative idea: the cumulative stress of racism is taking a toll on African American families even before they are born.

Image Thumbnail What If We Were Equal? A Comparison Of The Black-White Mortality Gap In 1960 And 2000 E-mail to a friend
SCHOLARLY ARTICLE by David Satcher, et al., Health Affairs, 2005

The United States has made progress in decreasing the black-white gap in civil rights, housing, education, and income since 1960, but health inequalities persist. We examined trends in black-white standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for each age-sex group from 1960 to 2000. The black-white gap measured by SMR changed very little between 1960 and 2000 and actually worsened for infants and for African American men age thirty-five and older. In contrast, SMR improved in African American women. Using 2002 data, an estimated 83,570 excess deaths each year could be prevented in the United States if this black-white mortality gap could be eliminated.

Image Thumbnail When the Bough Breaks - Episode Description (pdf) E-mail to a friend
UNNATURAL CAUSES, Episode 2

African American infant mortality rates remain twice as high as for white Americans.  Black mothers with graduate degrees have as many low birth-weight babies as white women who haven’t finished high school. How does the chronic stress of racism over the life course become embedded in our bodies and increase risks?

Image Thumbnail When the Bough Breaks - Transcript (pdf) E-mail to a friend
UNNATURAL CAUSES, Episode 2

African American infant mortality rates remain twice as high as for white Americans.  Black mothers with graduate degrees have as many low birth-weight babies as white women who haven’t finished high school. How does the chronic stress of racism over the life course become embedded in our bodies and increase risks?

Image Thumbnail When the Bough Breaks - Transcript with Citations (pdf) E-mail to a friend
UNNATURAL CAUSES, Episode 2, Copyright Vital Pictures 2008
Image Thumbnail Where Race Lives E-mail to a friend
INTERACTIVITY from RACE: The Power of an Illusion, 2003

Where you live in the U.S. isn't just a matter of preference. It's also about providing for the future. Does everyone have the same access to home ownership, good schools, and resources?

Explore how government policies and past discrimination have made generating wealth easier for some Americans than for others.

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